• Home
  • |
  • Blog
  • |
  • Geneu: Skin Care Product Based On DNA Testing

December 8, 2014

Geneu: Skin Care Product Based On DNA Testing

Using Genes and Technology to Improve Skin Care

Can a microchip improve skin care? Yes, it seems. Using a new microchip scientists can sequence your DNA in 30 minutes and customize a skin serum to optimize collagen production – the key to great looking skin. What’s the name of this skin serum? Geneu (gene you). Geneu represents the first attempt of using DNA to formulate a skin care product.

Analysis of a person’s genetic code can determine¬†how fast one breaks down collagen as well as determine their level of antioxidants. Collagen is the main structural protein in skin making skin plump and supple. Antioxidants fight free radicals that damage skin (and other tissues). In clinical trials lasting over 18 months Geneu was shown to reduce fine lines and wrinkles 30 percent in as little as 12 weeks.

Geneu

Geneu was developed based on work by Professor Chris Toumazou who also invented the cochlear implant, the artificial pancreas, and the wireless heart monitor. Geneu is possible because of his latest invention, the microchip that analyzes DNA obtained from a cheek swab.

It turns out some people degrade collagen much faster than average while others slower than average. So it helps to have a product that can tailor the collagen needs for each individual. It turns out that too much collagen can be damaging too. By analyzing one’s DNA a precise determination can be made at the rate that collagen is being metabolize and needs to be replaced.

Geneu contains more than collagen, though. Other active ingredients include white mulberry root extract, vitamins A and C (antioxidants), red baron grass, and tripeptides (amino acids) that stimulate cell rejuvenation and boost natural collagen production.

In the future Geneu will also include ingredients to address SPF and other markers of skin health based on DNA analysis.

DNA and the Microchip

Geneu is one of the first applications of the new microchip technology, but Professor Toumazou sees the microchip being used to individualize the use of other medications like statin drugs used to lower cholesterol. And, it’s the use of the microchip in this capacity that holds more promise than being simply used to develop a skin care product.

 

Related Posts

Does Verisol Reduce Wrinkles?

Does Verisol Reduce Wrinkles?

How to Make Your Own Natural Deodorant and Why You Should

How to Make Your Own Natural Deodorant and Why You Should

Why Fiber Prevents Heart Disease

Why Fiber Prevents Heart Disease

Does Testosterone Therapy Lower Prostate Cancer Risk?

Does Testosterone Therapy Lower Prostate Cancer Risk?

Dr. Joe Jacko


Dr. Joe is board certified in internal medicine and sports medicine with additional training in hormone replacement therapy and regenerative medicine. He has trained or practiced at leading institutions including the Hughston Clinic, Cooper Clinic, Steadman-Hawkins Clinic of the Carolinas, and Cenegenics. He currently practices in Columbus, Ohio. Read more about Dr. Joe Jacko

{"email":"Email address invalid","url":"Website address invalid","required":"Required field missing"}