• Home
  • |
  • Blog
  • |
  • How to Use Castor Oil for Acne-Top Tips and Remedies

January 25, 2017

How to Use Castor Oil for Acne-Top Tips and Remedies

An estimated 60 million Americans have acne; products and remedies to fight pimples have become an industry worth billions. With so many acne treatments on the market, why use the same treatment that the ancient Egyptians used to improve your skin? Castor oil for acne works differently from most acne medications, is inexpensive, available without a prescription, and can be utilized in a number of ways.

castor oil table beans

About Castor Oil

Facials at a spa and prescription medications can help acne, but both can cost hundreds of dollars. The ancient world knew that clear skin was not elusive, or for the elite. Castor oil ranges in price, depending on the brand and purity, but is much less than most acne treatments. Typically, you can purchase an 8-ounce bottle at a drug store less than $6, or 8-ounces of organic castor oil for less than $18.

If you suffer from acne, you may use many products to clean your skin. The problem with many of these concoctions is that they strip your skin of much of its oil. Then your skin makes more oil, and then you have more acne. It’s a never-ending cycle. It may seem counterintuitive to use oil on your skin to clean it when your skin may already feel like an oil slick, but castor oil is a natural astringent, and it’s the main ingredient in many acne soaps. Castor oil heals acne by gently drawing dirt, bacteria, and toxins out of the skin, while the oil stimulates the production of collagen and helps heal acne scars. Castor oil helps in slowing down the growth of bacteria, regulating oil production, and decreasing the inflammation that causes acne.

Tips for Using Castor Oil for Acne

1. Check your Allergies

Before using castor oil for acne, check if you might be allergic to it by testing a small patch of your skin on the inside of your wrist. Using organic castor oil may lessen the chance that you have an allergic reaction. After you rub a small amount of oil into your wrist and let it soak in, then wait 24 hours before proceeding with trying it on your face. If you don’t have any irritation from the test, try washing your face with castor oil once a day for several days. If you don’t have any redness or inflammation after the first few days, you can wash your face with castor oil twice daily.

2. Wash with a Mild Soap

Wash your hands and pull any loose hair back. Wash your face with a mild facial soap. Make a paste of soap and water in your hands then apply it evenly to your face. Don’t scrub or exfoliate, as this can exacerbate acne. Move your hands in small outward moving circles. Depending on how sensitive your skin is, using a tissue, gently wipe off the soap, dampening the tissue with water as needed. Don’t use a washcloth, as the rough service may further aggravate the skin, and you also want to avoid transmitting more bacteria onto your face. In the evening, you may choose to leave the castor oil on overnight, or you may leave it on for an hour up to twice daily, and then rinse with soap.

3. Blend Oils

You may find castor oil easier to use when you dilute it with other oils. Castor oil works particularly well when combined with camphor oil, almond oil, grapeseed oil, jojoba oil, sunflower oil, and coconut oil. You may need to try several combinations to find the one that is right for you. Like castor oil, many of these oils contain antioxidants and are very moisturizing; when combined with castor oil for acne, they become a powerful pimple-fighting agent. To apply the oils, wash your hands and massage the oils with your fingertips into your face, using the same gently outward circular motion you use to wash your face. Just as with castor oil, make sure to test a small patch of skin before using any other oil to check for allergies.

4. Steam Your Face

If you have suffered from acne for a while, you may also have acne scars. Not only does castor oil heal acne, but it also helps treat scars. Once you find the right blending of oils, you can massage them into your face for 20 minutes daily. Then two or three times per week, you can steam your face. To steam your face, bring a pot of water to boil. Carefully remove the pot of water from the stove, put a towel over your head, and relax as you breathe in the steam. Steaming will take about ten minutes.

5. Log Your Treatment

As you are experimenting with what combinations of oil, massage, and steaming works for you, you may experience some irritation. If you do, stop using castor oil for a day or two and only cleanse with a mild facial soap. Once the inflammation is gone, continue pursuing the right blend. As you are finding the right blend of oils and protocol for you, you may find it helpful to write down what you do, so that when your skin begins to improve, or if you see irritation, you will be able to retrace your steps and eventually, create the perfect skin regimen for you.

6. Be Patient

One of the principal keys to treating pimples with castor oil is patience. Most people who will benefit from using castor oil for acne see results within six weeks. Castor oil for acne isn’t an overnight fix, but using it can provide significant improvements over time. Also, while the financial commitment to a more natural regimen is far less than visiting a spa or going to a dermatologist, for best results, invest in organic, minimally refined products that will be gentler on your skin.

Conclusion

In conclusion, castor oil for acne treatment is inexpensive, readily available, non-drying, and easy to use. Have you tried medical spas, prescription medications, lasers, and nothing has worked on your acne? If you have and you would be willing to try castor oil for acne treatment, we would love to hear from you! Also, if you have other tips for using castor oil for acne treatment, let us know.

Image from depositphotos.com.

Related Posts

Can Keto Diet Cause Gallbladder Problems And Gallstone Issues?

Can Keto Diet Cause Gallbladder Problems And Gallstone Issues?

Keto Diet And Ulcers: Is There A Correlation?

Keto Diet And Ulcers: Is There A Correlation?

Ketosis | Definition, Benefits, Risks, And Symptoms of this Growing Trend

Ketosis | Definition, Benefits, Risks, And Symptoms of this Growing Trend

Ketosis vs Glycolysis: What’s the Big Deal?

Ketosis vs Glycolysis: What’s the Big Deal?

Dr. Joe Jacko


Dr. Joe is board certified in internal medicine and sports medicine with additional training in hormone replacement therapy and regenerative medicine. He has trained or practiced at leading institutions including the Hughston Clinic, Cooper Clinic, Steadman-Hawkins Clinic of the Carolinas, and Cenegenics. He currently practices in Columbus, Ohio. Read more about Dr. Joe Jacko

{"email":"Email address invalid","url":"Website address invalid","required":"Required field missing"}